Tag Archives: A2

MIGHT

You might have to teach your students how to express probability: here is an exercise you might find useful.

You might like it… or you might not, so please let me know and leave your comment. See you soon!

 

Complete the sentences with might or might not and a suitable verb.

  1. Charles isn’t here today. He __________ ill.
  2. It ___________ much, but at least it’s something.
  3. If I were you, I wouldn’t buy that laptop: you __________ a cheaper one on the internet.
  4. I rang her up, but she didn’t answer. She ___________ at home.
  5. Take the umbrella, it ___________ .
  6. I’m coming down with flu, I ___________ to the party tonight.
  7. If Sean doesn’t study hard, he ___________ the exam.
  8. The traffic is very bad, they __________ late for work.
  9. The line you quoted ________ or ______________ in this book, honestly I don’t know.
  10. Your eyes are red, you have a temperature and your nose is congested: you _____________ flu.

 

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HAVE YOU EVER…? – part 1

It might be quite hard for some students to fully understand how to use the present perfect well.

This is why, instead of a long list of examples and a 30-minute lecture on “How to Use the Present Perfect Simple and Continuous”, you might want to try this: teaching them one function at a time in a particular context. It can turn out to be very effective… and not so boring!

Today we will focus on questions with have you ever + past participle to ask people if they have done something in their lives.

Make questions using the prompts given:

  1. have/Japanese food?
    Have you ever had Japanese food?
  2. argue/with your best friend?
  3. smoke/a cigarette?
  4. eat/raw meat?
  5. lose/your passport?
  6. meet/a celebrity?
  7. drink/whiskey?
  8. drive/a car?
  9. play/tennis?
  10. ride/a horse?
  11. get/a tattoo?
  12. cheat/on an exam?
  13. climb/a mountain?
  14. win/a competition?
  15. see/a whale?
  16. write/a poem?

Then have the students ask and answer questions, either in pairs (A asks B, B asks A) or in “chain” (A asks B, who in turn asks C, who in turn asks D, etc.).

Next time we’ll deal with have you ever and the verb go. Bye!


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EXPRESSING QUANTITY

If you want to do the shopping in English, you need to know what to ask for… but also HOW to ask for it. So which things go with which amounts?

expressing quantities

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DEFINITE AND INDEFINITE ARTICLES

Complete following sentences using the right article: THE, A, or AN, only when necessary (sometimes no article is required).

  1. We fed the pigeons in _____ Trafalgar Square.
  2. There’s a clinic on _____ left.
  3. The Queen lives in _____ Buckingham Palace.
  4. What did you see at _____ Globe Theatre?
  5. We went sightseeing and we saw _____ Eiffel Tower.
  6. The museum is between _____ bank and the hotel.
  7. Is there _____ supermarket in Anfield Road?
  8. Jane went on a boat on _____ River Thames.
  9. Take _____ second turning on the right.
  10. There is _____ underground station near here.

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PREPOSITIONS – IN, AT, ON

Complete the following sentences with the appropriate preposition. Use IN, AT, or ON.

  1. Dad isn’t _____ the kitchen.
  2. Jamie is sitting ____ the park bench.
  3. I don’t like lying ____ the sofa, I prefer sitting ____ the armchair.
  4. Could you put this book back ____ the shelf, please?
  5. Sit down and open your books ____ page 16.
  6. I’ll see you tomorrow ____ the station.
  7. Come here, don’t stand ____ the doorway, have a seat!
  8. I live ____ Willow Lane.
  9. I live ____ 23 Willow Lane.
  10. I can’t stand Sam: he’s never ____ time!

Note: by limiting the number of prepositions to three, the exercise turns out to be much easier for students. In case you want to make things harder, don’t tell them which prepositions they have to use, and mix this exercise together with other similar ones.

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